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Talking to Your Loved Ones about ADL

While the decision to add assistance in ADL’s may be easy for a person caring for a loved one, it might not be so easy for the person receiving the assistance. How do you tell your loved one that a stranger will be coming into the home to help with daily activities, especially when that person has taken care of everything themselves for years? It can be difficult at first, but going slow and exercising patience is important. Asking others to help is also important. Vancouver Home Health Care Agency will help with this important transition, in addition to other professionals.

Talk to the Doctor
Begin with the loved one’s primary physician. Write down your concerns and the warning signs you’ve noticed, then approach the doctor to review your concerns. Tell the doctor you believe it’s time for additional care. Discuss the stress placed on your family and the need for additional assistance. Be sure to impress upon the doctor the desire to keep the loved one in their home, and employ the doctor’s assistance in easing the transition. Ask the doctor to talk to the loved one about in-home care and assistance with ADL’s. Sometimes, the loved one needs to hear the information from someone outside the family to fully accept the transition.

Talk to the Loved One
The Alzheimer’s Association recommends talking to the loved one through every change, and remembering that change is difficult for everyone. The loved one might harbor feelings of neglect, even though the family members will continue to visit. Approaching the loved one with these changes can be difficult for both the family member and the person receiving care.

Review Scenarios
Before approaching the loved one, review what might happen during the conversation. Try to be prepared for any possible reaction to the news that a new person will be managing care. A range of emotions is possible, so mentally prepare yourself.

Explain Fully
Explain what will happen and who will be coming into the home. The Vancouver Home Health Care Agency can help you gather information for this part of the conversation. Tell the loved one that professional care is necessary to keep him or her safe and happy in the home.

Be There
Tell the loved one you will continue to visit, then keep that promise. If possible, and if requested, be there for the first in home visit. This will help the loved one feel more secure in the change and will communicate that you are still there for him or her, despite the need for outside care.

Talk To Other Family Members and Friends
Hold a meeting and talk to others who care about your loved one. Perhaps your loved one will hide his or her feelings from you, but talk to others. Perhaps the loved one will have mixed feelings about the change, and discuss these feelings with others. Help others understand why the change is necessary and how the change will take place, then employ them to help with the transition. It is important to make the change as easy as possible for everyone, which means others may need to help.

Talk to Clergy or Psychologists
Talk to someone about how you feel, and ask someone to talk to your loved one about how he or she feels. This is a big change for everyone involved, and forgetting about the emotional or spiritual aspect of the change will leave you emotionally drained. Discussing how the change affects you and your loved one emotionally will help ease any guilt, frustration, or negative feelings associated with the change.

The Vancouver Home Health Care Agency is determined to keep your loved one in his or her home while helping you maintain the life to which you are accustomed. We will help you through the process, from finding the right type of care to discussing the incoming care with your loved one.
At Vancouver Home Health Care Agency, Caring and Compassion is our business.

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